Data

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The Group of Twenty (G20) recognizes that financial inclusion is a key enabler in the fight against poverty. Reliable data covering the major components of sustainable financial inclusion development is critical to inform these policies and to monitor the effect of initiatives. Data also provides a starting point on which to base ambitious financial inclusion targets.

The Global Partnership for Financial Inclusion (GPFI) developed the indicators, which were endorsed by G20 leaders in 2012.  An expanded set of indicators, including financial literacy, use and quality of financial services, was endorsed by the GPFI in 2013. New indicators measuring the use of digital payments and access to digital infrastructure were endorsed in 2016. This portal is powered by the World Bank’s Data Group.

Through this portal you can find the most recent data on the G20 Financial Inclusion Indicators

The indicators assess the state of financial inclusion and digital financial services, nationally and globally. This data, which measures access and use of quality of financial services, can be used by countries to support their financial inclusion goals.

Key findings:

  • Financial inclusion is on the rise. Globally, 515 million adults opened an account at a financial institution or through a mobile money service between 2014 and 2017. This represents a rise from 62% to 69% of the adult population owning an account. Despite this progress, 1.7 billion adults remain unbanked and inequalities persist. Women in developing countries remain 9 percentage points less likely than men to have an account. (Global Findex)
  • Mobile money continues to grow in all regions, especially in West Africa. In low-income economies, there are twice as many mobile money accounts than bank accounts per 1,000 adults.  (IMF Financial Access Survey)
  • Small and medium-sized businesses are mostly excluded from formal borrowing, despite increasingly having an account at a financial service provider. For instance, in Latin America and the Caribbean, about 90% of firms have an account, although only half have a bank loan or line of credit from a bank. (World Bank Enterprise Surveys)
  • People over 60 are joining the digital age. Two-thirds of older adults in developing countries, and 85% in wealthier economies, own a mobile phone. They are half as likely as younger adults to make a payment using a mobile phone or the internet. (Global Findex)